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Rokou, E. and Kirytopoulos, K.2014, ‘A Calibrated Group Decision Process’, Group Decision and Negotiation, 23, 1369–1384

DOI: 10.1007/s10726-013-9374-2

Abstract:

In practice most organisational decisions are made by groups that bring into the problem multiple perspectives, both complementary and contradictory. When having a group of decision makers, usually individuals’ preferences are either led to
consensus or are aggregated with the use of some function like the median, the arithmetic or geometric mean. We focus in the second case, where individual’s preferences need to be aggregated. Our approach is based on the fact that when two decision mak-
ers are asked to give their preference between a pair of criteria using a specific scale, it is possible that they will give slightly different answers, even when they actually have the same opinion. This difference will not affect the case of a single decision
maker, as it will be consistent throughout the whole process. However, it can affect a group decision when the values will be used as an input for the aggregation function. A novel approach is presented that enhances group decision making through a group
calibration process. The proposed process adjusts individuals’ preferences based on their answers on a set of standardized questions prior to the aggregation phase. The method focuses The whole concept is applied to the group analytical network process
method and it is illustrated through a telecommunications project case. The decision under examination concerns the selection of the right place for deploying a new telecom service of a multinational-based telecommunications company where a group
of geographically dispersed decision makers form an ad-hoc virtual team in order to select the location for a new technical support centre.

Keywords Group decision and negotiations · Analytical network process · Multiple criteria analysis

Rokou, E. and Kirytopoulos, K.2014, ‘A Calibrated Group Decision Process’, Group Decision and Negotiation, 23, 1369–1384